What’s New With Kernl – November 2019

November was a great month for Kernl! After several years of trying, we finally launched team management and also made our pricing structure easier to understand. Let’s dive in!

Features

  • Team Management – With our new Agency and Unlimited plans you can now grant users access to your account! The Agency plan allows for 3 team members and unlimited allows for unlimited team members.
  • Agency & Unlimited Plans – We introduced an unlimited plan for Kernl which has no usage limits (with the exception of load testing, but those limits have been increased substantially) and includes team management and Kernl Analytics. We also updated our agency plan to more closely match the old enterprise plan. The new agency plan has much higher limits than the previous agency plan as well as access to team management.

Bug Fixes & Other

  • Increased Load Test Generator VM Size – We’ve increased the load test generator machines from 1vCPU to 2vCPUs to allow us to scale our load testing up to 50,000 concurrent users.
  • Repository Sync – When we changed how you connected to your Git repositories we overlooked the ability to sync them from that same location. We’ve added that ability back in.
  • Load Test List Page Performance – With some clever SQL querying and awesome Postgres built-in functions, we’ve decreased the average load time on this page by 32%.
  • Bug: Invalid license if using licenses but no versions present – An odd edge case was found where Kernl would say your license was invalid if you didn’t have any plugin/theme versions uploaded. This has been resolved.
  • Bug: IPv6 Issue on Load Generators – The virtual machines that we spin up the Digital Ocean Singapore data center were having issues communicating over IPv6. We disabled IPv6 for all load generators for the time being.
  • Load Testing Service Node.js Upgrade – The WordPress load testing service backend and workers have been upgraded from Node.js 10.x to Node.js 12.x. All packages were upgraded to their latest with this change.
  • Analytics Service Node.js Upgrade – The WordPress analytics service backend was upgraded from Node.js 10.x to Node.js 12.x. All packages were upgraded to their latest with this change.

Blog Posts

Popular WordPress Plugin Performance Implications: Wordfence

That’s it for this month! Have a great December!

WordPress Plugin Performance Implications: Wordfence

In the world of WordPress there are a lot of different plugins you can install to extend its functionality. One of the most popular plugins is Wordfence, a security plugin developed by the fine folks over at Defiant.

Test the performance implications of your own WordPress plugins with Kernl WordPress Load Testing.

Most WordPress developers understand that the more plugins you add to your site the slower it goes, but exactly how much slower isn’t something that is often measured. More importantly, nobody has bothered to figure out the performance implications of installing many of the most popular plugins available to WordPress users today.

This all changes now with this series of blog posts exploring the performance implications of different WordPress plugins. In this series of posts we’ll test each plugin in isolation and then with caching enabled using Kernl’s WordPress load testing service. First up, is Wordfence.

Machine Setup

The test machine for these tests was a $5 Digital Ocean droplet in their SFO2 (San Francisco) data center. The machine has 1GB of RAM, 1 vCPU, and a 25GB hard disk.

The software installed on the machine is as follows:

  • Ubuntu 19.04 with all updates installed.
  • Nginx 1.16.1
  • PHP-FPM 7.3
  • MariaDB 10.3

For tests that required caching we used our favorite caching plugin, W3 Total Cache, with memcached as the data store.

The theme that was used was TwentyTwenty with no modifications and the content was an export of this blog.

All traffic was generated out of Digital Ocean’s NYC3 (New York City) data center.

Test Methodology

A series of 4 tests were run to test the performance implications of installing Wordfence. They were:

Each test was with 200 concurrent users for 1 hour.

Maximum Requests per Second

The first metric that we looked at was the maximum requests per second that the site was able to handle under each situation outlined above.

Wordfence - Maximum Requests per Second
Wordfence – Maximum Requests per Second

As you can see the difference between having Wordfence enabled and having Wordfence disabled is huge. The non-cached site with no plugins enabled handled a maximum of 26 requests per second. With Wordfence enabled it could only handle 12.

More interesting though was that with caching enabled (W3 Total Cache) the site could handle 165 requests per second, but only 67 requests per second with Wordfence enabled.

These results were so surprising that we ran the tests twice. The results were the same (within 1%-2%) each time.

First Error Occurrence

The next metric we looked at was when did the first error occur during our load tests.

Wordfence - First Error req/s
Wordfence – First Error req/s

Once again we see that adding Wordfence took a pretty serious toll on our performance. For the baseline test (no plugins, no cache) we see our first error at around 26 requests / second. In the Wordfence test with no cache we saw it at 12 requests / second.

With our caching enabled test, we never saw any errors when Wordfence wasn’t enabled. However with Wordfence enabled we saw our first error at 56 requests / second.

Average Response Time

Now that we’ve looked at server capacity metrics (max requests, first error), let’s take a look at how your end user experience changes with Wordfence enabled.

Wordfence - Avg. Response Time (milliseconds)
Wordfence – Avg. Response Time (milliseconds)

These results were fairly interesting and not at all what was expected. The average response time for the baseline test was around 4.6 seconds, while the average response with Wordfence enabled was about 2.5 seconds. So why might that be? Looking through the data it appears that the baseline test had far more successful requests and that with Wordfence enabled the requests seemed to fail faster. In short, baseline test had higher throughput but slower response time. The Wordfence test had lower throughput and faster response time.

Turning our attention to the caching scenarios, we can see that enabling Wordfence is extremely problematic at scale. With caching enabled, our baseline test had an average response time of 146ms. With caching + Wordfence that time ballooned over 10x to 1874ms.

99th Percentile Response Time

Our final metric was looking at the 99th percentile response times for our different scenarios. What does that mean? It answers the question “How long does it take for 99% of requests to finish?”. This intentionally leaves out the last 1% because those are often outliers.

Wordfence - 99th Percentile Response Time
Wordfence – 99th Percentile Response Time

As you can see above, the un-cached 99th percentile hovers right around 5s when Wordfence is enabled or disabled. Since this is the 99th percentile such a high response time isn’t too surprising in both scenarios.

The more interesting scenario is when caching is enabled. For WordPress with only a caching plugin running, the 99th percentile is 370ms. That means 99% of all requests finished in 370ms. With Wordfence also enabled (Wordfence + caching), that number jumped to 2400ms. That’s a ~7X increase.

Conclusions

From these tests we came to a few conclusions:

  1. Caching does not solve all of your performance problems. If your cache strategy relies on requests making it all the way through to WordPress, then you are very likely to still take a performance hit from other plugins. Things like Cloudflare, Varnish, Litespeed, or Nginx can help alleviate this problem.
  2. Running Wordfence is expensive from a performance standpoint. The data suggests that by simply enabling Wordfence you lose about 50% of your maximum capacity and can increase your response time between 2x-7x.
  3. Wordfence is still worth it for a lot of people. If you’ve operated a WordPress site for any length of time you know how often they get attacked. Wordfence does a great job of reducing attack surface area and making it hard for people to attack you.

Test the performance implications of your own WordPress plugins with Kernl WordPress Load Testing.

Introducing Team Management and the Kernl Unlimited Plan

One of the most requested features that Kernl gets is Team Management. Team management can take on a lot of different forms, but for Kernl’s purposes it is the ability to share access via the Kernl interface with multiple people with different sets of credentials.

Team Management

Starting today you can sign up for the Kernl Unlimited plan (see below) and start managing your team. Team management allows you to share your Kernl account with authorized users. When a user is part of your team, they have a slightly restricted view of Kernl but otherwise see the same things you do. What’s restricted?

  • Continuous Deployment – Adding connected Git repositories is the responsibility of the admin. Non-admin users don’t need to see this information.
  • Billing – Once again, this is an admin responsibility. The admin is able to change plans, add credit cards, etc.
  • Team Management – Only the admin can add and remove users from their account.

Aside from that everything is the same for admin and non-admin users.

Kernl Team Management

The Unlimited Plan & Pricing Changes

In addition to team management we are also reducing the number of plans that Kernl has. Prior to this change we had 5 different plans (solo, agency, enterprise, huge, massive) which seemed like a bit much. To simplify Kernl’s pricing structure and give our customers better options we went down to 3 plans:

  • Solo – This $9 per month plan is our base plan. Most customers start here and then grow into larger plans as their needs change.
  • Agency – The $39 agency plan is essentially our former “Enterprise” plan but with increased limits for plugins, themes, licenses, load testing, and feature flags.
  • Unlimited – This new $79 unlimited plan allows you to have unlimited plugins, themes, licenses, feature flags and very high limited on load testing (50K concurrent users). This plan also includes team management so you can more easily control access to your Kernl account.

As always, current Kernl customers are grandfathered into the plan that they are currently on.

Kernl Pricing

What’s Next?

Now that Kernl has a more robust upper-level offering we hope to start rolling more features into it. For example:

  • In the near future we’ll include Kernl Analytics with Unlimited plan.
  • We’re also planning on rolling out limited team management into the Agency plan.