What’s New With Kernl – March 2020

With all the uncertainty in the world right now due to COVID-19, we are intentionally keeping things boring at Kernl. Bug fixes, new docs, and increased capacity are all we did this month.

Stay safe out there everyone!

Features, Bugs, Updates

  • NEW DOCUMENTATION! – After 5 years we finally moved to a real documentation generator! In the process of moving docs to the new system, all of the docs were updated and checked for accuracy. Check it out at https://docs.kernl.us.
  • Site Health – You can now change you wp-json root. Some people change this for security reasons. Site Health needs it for some of the more advanced functionality.
  • Site Health Timezone Bugs – Timezones are hard and our Site Health service wasn’t using them correctly.
  • Analytics VM Changes – The Kernl Analytics service was starting to get bogged down with increased traffic. It now has 2 vCPUs and 2GB of RAM (up from 1 vCPU and 1GB).
  • Analytics Bug – We were logging analytics data for customers that aren’t paying for it. This is no longer the case.
  • Plugin/Theme Git Status – The plugin and theme list pages were displaying inconsistent results for the Git status of plugins/themes. There was an error in our Mongo query that populated this data which has been resolved.
  • Load Testing Remain Resources – The remaining resources page can take a while to load sometimes because we have to call out to external services. An indeterminate loading spinner was added to let customers know that it’s still working.
  • System Updates – All operating system level packages have been upgraded to their latest available version.
new documentation by docsify
New documentation by Docsify

WordPress Site Health by Kernl

After 5 months of development and 2 months of closed beta, we are happy to announce the public availability of Kernl’s WordPress Site Health service.

Kernl WordPress Site Health screenshot

What is it?

Kernl’s WordPress Site Health service allows you to understand changes in your site’s health. But what does that mean? We monitor your response times, time to first byte (TTFB), Google Lighthouse scores, plugin changes (added, updated, or deleted), as well as CPU, disk, and memory usage.

Using the data above, you can see when the health of your site started to degrade and why. Maybe it was when a plugin got updated or installed? Perhaps you started to run out of memory? With Kernl’s WordPress Site Health you can figure this out at a glance.

WordPress plugin changes and lighthouse scores

Common Use Cases

While this tool is not a monitoring service, the value it can provide to you and your customers is immense.

  • Identify the source of performance regressions – The data gathered by our WordPress Site Health service makes it easy to identify the source of performance regressions. Because we capture machine-level information (CPU, Memory, Disk) and when plugins were added/updated/removed, it’s easy to draw a line between response time or TTFB increases and changes in your WordPress site & host.
  • Monitor changes in Google Lighthouse scores – Google Lighthouse is a series of tests against your site that checks for modern web best practices. Kernl runs Lighthouse against your site once per day and graphs the results. If you see a score go down, you can look at the other data we gather to try and tie it back to a change in your site.

WordPress Site Health Pricing & Limits

Kernl’s WordPress Site Health is included in every Kernl plan. The only thing that changes are the number of sites you can add and the check frequency.

Plan# of SiteCheck Frequency
Solo210 minutes
Agency105 minutes
UnlimitedUnlimited1 minute

Sign Up Now

You can sign up now for free. Kernl comes with a 30 day free trial and no credit card is required.