Cloudways WordPress Performance Value Review

Cloudways is a managed WordPress hosting provider that allows you to deploy your WordPress site onto several different platforms. These platforms are:

Cloudways home page
Cloudways!

If you are just starting with Cloudways it can be tough to figure out where your money is best spent! The prices are different for each platform and how they are sized isn’t them same either. This review gathers data using Kernl’s WordPress Load Testing tool and then massages that data into someone easy to digest.

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What Was Tested?

We tested the following Cloudways setups:

  • Google Cloud – A “small” instance out of their Northern Virginia data center. $39.36 / month.
  • Amazon Web Services – A “small” instance out of their Northern Virginia data center. $36.51 / month.
  • Vultr – “2GB” plan out of their New Jersey data center. $23 / month
  • Linode – “2GB” plan from their New Jersey data center. $24 / month
  • Digital Ocean – “2GB” plan from one of the New York City data centers. $22 / month.

And we had the following load testing setup:

  • Content was an export of this blog
  • 1000 concurrent users
  • 30 minute duration
  • 3 users per second ramp up
  • Load generating machines were in the San Francisco #2 Digital Ocean data center.

Overall Cloudways Performance and Value

Each provider performed extremely well in our tests. No errors were reported and they all reached over 700 requests / s sustained traffic. However not all hosts are created equal.

AWSGCPLinodeVultrDigital Ocean
Costs / Month (cents)36513936240023002200
Total Requests13409671274018144230114557221445759
$ / 1000 req (cents)2.723.091.661.581.52

Given that each load test was exactly the same, you can see that some hosts performed better than others.

Cost per 1000 requests (in cents)

AWS and GCP are a bit more costly than Linode, Vultr, and Digital Ocean and they also performed worse than the lower cost providers.

Cloudways Provider Response Times

While cost per requests is a good metric we also care about the quality of those requests. Quality can be measured in a number of ways, but response time is often a “good enough” measure of how well a particular host performs. For the providers that you can get through Cloudways, the variance in request quality is extremely interesting.

The chart below shows the 99th percentile response time performance for each provider. It means that 99% of all requests during the load test finished at or below this time.

99th percentile performance

You can see that lower cost providers once again out-perform the higher cost AWS and GCP in pretty significant ways. The really interesting result here is that Vultr responded to 99% of requests in 240ms or less! Way to go Vultr!

Conclusions

If you aren’t sure which provider is the best value on Cloudways, from a raw cents per requests perspective you can’t go wrong with Linode, Vultr, and Digital Ocean. It’s the same story when you consider the quality (re: response time) of service: Vultr, Linode, and Digital Ocean are the clear winners here.

Full WordPress Load Test Results:

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WordPress Performance on DigitalOcean Managed MySQL

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The database is the most important part of any WordPress site. If you aren’t adept at managing MySQL, it can be a serious risk for you and your clients. One way to de-risk this portion of your WordPress site is by going with a managed MySQL offering. There are ton of different options out there, but for this post we’re going to look at Digital Ocean’s Managed MySQL.

DigitalOcean DB SaaS background.

Why Use DigitalOcean Managed MySQL?

There are a lot of reasons to use Digital Ocean’s Managed MySQL (or some other offering) including:

  • Simple Setup – With a few simple clicks you can have a high quality MySQL cluster set up.
  • Horizontal Scalability – Site growing fast? You can spin up read-only nodes to help scale out read operations.
  • Automated Daily Backups – No need to set up your own backups. DigitalOcean takes care of it for you.
  • Automated Failover – If for some reason your primary database node fails, you will automatically fail over to your warm spare.
  • Security – MySQL best practices for security are automatically followed by DigitalOcean. In addition to that your database is isolated to your private network so that outside requests can’t access it by default.

Baseline Performance Test

To get things started let’s do a baseline performance test where the MySQL database is on the same box as the Nginx server. The server configuration is as follows:

  • 1GB RAM
  • 3 vCPU
  • Nginx
  • PHP-FPM 7.2
  • MariaDB 10.1
  • No caching

A test of 400 concurrent users was run using Kernl’s WordPress Load Testing service. Without caching the results are predictably bad, but that is to be expected.

Graph of requests per second for self-hosted MySQL with WordPress
Things fall apart at around ~70 req/sec

For completeness, let’s also take a look at the response time distribution.

Response time distribution for self hosted MySQL with WordPress
99% of requests finish in ~2 seconds

Given how many failing requests we had and zero caching, the ones that did manage to get through didn’t perform too poorly. 99% in 2 seconds or less.

DigitalOcean Managed MySQL

When setting up a managed MySQL database on DigitalOcean you get the option to select the underlying hardware that powers it. For this blog post we went with the minimum possible configuration (1GB RAM, 1vCPU).

Knowing that fewer resources were allocated, it was expected that performance would actually be a bit worse on the dedicated MySQL instance. These expectations were confirmed with the load test.

Graph of requests per second for DigitalOcean Managed MySQL with WordPress
Things go sideways at ~50 req/s.

All things considered, 50 req/s against a WordPress site with no caching isn’t all that bad. Once we hit that level, the database charts were showing 100% CPU saturation and thats when we started to see the error rate increase. Now let’s look at the response time distribution.

Response time distribution for managed MySQL with WordPress
99% of requests finish in less than 2.6 seconds

As expected performance is slightly worse here due to fewer resources on the dedicated MySQL machine, but not in a huge way.

Cost & Why Managed MySQL is Important

For our test we used the most basic configuration that DigitalOcean offers:

  • 1 GB RAM
  • 1 vCPU
  • 10 GB Hard Disk
  • No failover
  • Automatic backups

All of this and not having to manage MySQL for $15/month. Not too bad, but to really be getting your money’s worth (automatic failover) you need to spend more money.

  • 2 GB RAM
  • 1 vCPU
  • 25 GB Hard Disk
  • 1 Standby node
  • Automatic failover
  • Automatic backups

With automatic failover you start to reduce the risk to yourself and your customers a lot. However, this level of availability isn’t free πŸ™‚ DigitalOcean doesn’t support failover on their cheapest node, so you have to upgrade to the next level ($30/month). After that, the failover node costs you an additional $20/month. Now we’re looking at $50/month for a managed MySQL cluster with automated failover.

If you run a WordPress based business on DigitalOcean, $50/month buys you a lot of peace of mind. It’s also easy to scale up as traffic increases and the cost is competitive in the landscape of managed MySQL. If you happen to be an excellent DBA though, you can definitely manage your own cluster at a reduced monetary cost, but increased time cost.

Conclusions

Managing your own database cluster is probably fine if cost is a problem and you are good at it. In general though, if you can afford it we recommend using a managed MySQL host so you can push the complexity of operating a highly available MySQL cluster on to someone else.

Want to performance test your own WordPress installation? Try Kernl’s WordPress Load Testing service.

Is More RAM or More CPU Better for WordPress Hosting?

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Throughout the lifetime of Kernl I’ve always kept an eye out for ways to reduce costs, which means I’ve constantly got an eye on Digital Ocean‘s droplet pricing to see if there are any cost efficiencies to be had. Back in January of 2018 Digital Ocean released what they called “flexible” plans. These plans are 3 droplet types that all cost $15/month, but have 3 different configurations:

  • 3GB RAM, 1 vCPU
  • 2GB RAM, 2 vCPUs
  • 1GB RAM, 3 vCPUs

I recently re-discovered these plans and thought to myself “Jack, you should load test these configurations and see which is better for WordPress!”. So here we are, attempting to answer the age-old question “Is RAM or CPU more important for WordPress performance?”.

Server Configuration

As with the $5 VPS shootout, I used the setup guide posted here to get a consistent setup across the different servers. I ended up with the following software versions:

  • Nginx 1.14.0
  • PHP FPM 7.2
  • MariaDB 10.1.1
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

The WordPress server location was in Digital Ocean’s London (lon1) data center and the load generators were located in Digital Ocean’s New York City 3 (nyc3) data center.

No caching was used for this test because I wanted to test WordPress performance, not caching plugin performance.

Content

The test WordPress site was populated with a WP export dump of this blog. That means that the test skewed extremely read-heavy. Your results may be different for a site that is write-heavy, but experience tells me that this probably isn’t true given how chatty WordPress is with MySQL in most situations.

Test A: 3GB RAM, 1 vCPU

The first test that I ran against the $15 droplet was with the 3GB RAM and 1 vCPU configuration. I had expected this to perform the worst out of any of the configurations due to WordPress generally being CPU bound when it comes to performance.

As you can see things went OK until we hit around 18 requests per second, and then everything went off the rails. This isn’t too surprising as I didn’t have any caching plugins installed. This is just raw WordPress with MySQL (MariaDB). I ended up killing the load test after 7 minutes because it was clear what the results were.

The response time distribution was also pretty terrible with a 99th percentile of slightly over 5 seconds.

Test B: 2GB RAM, 2 vCPUs

Next up was the 2GB of RAM with 2 vCPUs $15 configuration. I had actually thought that this configuration would perform the best due to the nice balance of RAM and CPUs. It performed better than the first test, but it wasn’t the best.

As you can see we had far fewer errors this time and were able to reach 60 requests per second. For those doing the math that is 3.3x better performance than a single vCPU (for the same price!).

The response time distribution was starting to look better with 2 vCPUs as well. The 99th percentile was ~2.7 seconds which isn’t too bad while serving 60 requests per second (5.1 million requests per day).

Test C: 1GB RAM, 3 vCPUs

Finally I tested the 1GB RAM, 3 vCPUs $15 configuration. Personally I thought that this would perform 2nd best because I figured the server would become RAM starved while trying to server more requests. I was wrong.

So for the same price as the 3GB RAM, 1 vCPU server we can get 6.5x the performance by simply choosing the configuration with more CPU availability. We peaked at around 118 requests per second (10.1 million requests per day) and then it started to trail off as we started to see errors.

The response time distribution was pretty excellent here and started to look like what we would see from high performance servers (1 big outlier with generally good response times across the rest of the spectrum). With the 99th percentile at 700ms it seems like a no-brainer to go with more vCPUs.

Conclusions

It seems obvious from the data presented above that you are always better off going with more vCPUs than RAM, but I hesitate to always recommend that because reality is more complicated. There are likely situations where a good balance of RAM and vCPUs would perform better (lots of image uploads and processing for example).

So what does this all mean? In most cases you are probably better off with more vCPUs instead of more RAM. However, I strongly recommend that you do some load testing to make sure that this is true for your WordPress site.

Want to performance test your own WordPress site? Try Kernl WordPress Load Testing!

Measuring the Performance of WordPress on DigitalOcean Droplets

Earlier this year Kernl launched our WordPress Load Testing offering. Prior to the launch we had been doing a series of blog posts testing the performance of “managed” WordPress providers. In this blog post I’ll test the performance of Digital Ocean’s VPS solutions with a standard LEMP (Linux Nginx MySQL PHP-FPM) installation by scaling it vertically.

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Server & WordPress Configuration

The Digital Ocean 1-click LEMP install is already configured to take full advantage of as many cores and as much RAM as is available. During the course of these tests I never needed to tweak any server settings. That doesn’t mean that more performance couldn’t have been extracted through configuration tweaks, but even with these settings we were able to gain useful information about WordPress performance on the different Digital Ocean droplet levels.

With regards to WordPress configuration… there isn’t any. No caching, CDNs, or compression. Just raw WordPress. Its easy to get high performance out of WordPress if you cache everything, but seeing what performance looks like in the worst-case scenario is far more interesting.

The Test

For this series of tests I imported the contents of my personal blog (Re-cycledair) to the target and then used Kernl to run the load tests. Due to the nature of my blog this test is very read heavy. While this isn’t realistic for everyone, for my personal blog the test is representative of the actual traffic that it receives.

The test itself looked like:

  • Concurrent users – 500
  • Ramp up – 2 users per second
  • Duration – 30 minutes
  • Request Rate – Each user makes 1 request every second
  • Droplet location – New York City
  • Load test generator location – Amsterdam

Results

As expected the amount of traffic that we could handle scaled linearly with the amount of hardware we were using (and cost).

Cost -vs- Performance

One interesting thing you’ll see in the graph is that in two places the requests per second actually trend down.

Data

Looking at the data above you can see that I tried Digital Ocean’s standard droplets as well as their CPU optimized droplets. The difference between them is cost and dedicated hyper-threads. From a cost perspective, you’re better off going with the standard droplet in the same price category. Personally I expected the CPU optimized droplet to perform better, but this might not be the best type of workload for it.

What About Caching?

Just for fun I tried out the one-click install of WordPress with LiteSpeed configured on a $5 / month droplet.

Things went really really really well.

πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

Thats right. By the time the test was completed my little $5 / month droplet was receiving 1800 requests / second WITH NO ERRORS. For perspective, thats 4.6 billion requests per month.

Conclusions

The data does a good job speaking for itself here, but in general you should definitely stick to Digital Ocean’s standard droplets when running WordPress. Even without caching you can get really good performance out of the $40/month droplet.

Want to measure your own WordPress performance under heavy load? Sign up for Kernl.